Creating Compound Names Like Instagram, Snapchat & Airport

Instagram and Snapchat are identical constructions. Each simply substitutes new words from an accepted utility name: Instant Message. Insta & Snap are synonyms for Instant, and Gram & Chat are substitutes for Message.

Since Instant Message is already a universally adopted name, you know that Instagram and Snapchat will be accepted as well. If what you’re naming doesn’t map to a two-word generic, break it down into one first.

You can do this by re-purposing an unrelated, well-known compound word, as in Apple’s Wi-Fi base station being called “Airport” – a port accessed through the air. It’s easy to remember and readily embraced because everyone knows the word Airport already.

Proposing a name like Airport to a committee will be met with immediate pushback such as, “Everyone hates the experience of an airport” or, “Last time I was there they cancelled my flight, I had to sleep on the floor and I missed my child’s birthday” or “The first thing I think of is stress, long lines and bad service”- as if any of this will make the name less successful, which of course it doesn’t.

As soon as the name Airport is applied to a Wi-Fi device the primary definition disappears, your audience puts the clever double meaning together in their heads in an “aha!” moment, and smile at the humanity you’ve brought to the game. They will think well of you and warmly embrace the name and its new meaning. And never forget it. You are immediately best of breed in their minds, having uttered only a single word.

Because this simple concept is inherently difficult for corporations, names like Airport are rare indeed – but they do happen.

Chain of Children’s Dental Offices We Named Launches

Smart Mouth

As you would expect, lots of their competitors have “smile” in their names. So instead, the name Smart Mouth makes you smile.

Using the word “smile” in a name is explanative, using words that cause your audience to smile is demonstrative.

In naming & branding, as in all aspects of life, demonstrating is always more effective than explaining.

It’s also a twist on a descriptive name, saying “It’s a Smart choice for your Mouth” and that the dentist is “Smart about Mouths”.

Since parents, not kid’s are the audience, giving them a laugh about their kids makes it work, makes it warm – and unforgettable.

Why are “Hotwire” & “Pandora” Powerful Names?

To understand why they work so well, you have to get literal for a moment:

Hotwire = “to steal a car”

Pandora = “unleashed plagues, diseases & all the evils of mankind”

These types of meanings will get a name dismissed ASAP by a naming committee – a committee that would have been wrong to dismiss these names, obviously.

Consumers don’t attribute these literal, negative qualities to the companies who use Hotwire & Pandora as their company names (you don’t, do you?). But naming committees erroneously believe they will.

In each case the name is a metaphor for something about the company. Hotwiring a car is a “hack”, Hotwire positions the site as a travel hack – a way around high prices. Pandora Radio is a marketplace, positioned metaphorically as a “box full of intrigue”.

When juxtaposed in line with the company’s positioning, the names simply become interesting – they have personality. They demonstrate confidence and uniqueness. Metaphorically re-purposing the negative is what makes them so positive.

The names are provocative, differentiating and memorable.

From a business perspective, these names are a pure positive, derived from a literal negative. It’s called “The Principle of Negativity”.

Don’t fear the Negative – well executed, it’s a Positive.

“Coin” Forgoes Matching Dotcom, Grabs Great Name Instead

“Coin” is simply one card to replace all the credit cards, bank cards, et al in your wallet. It’s linked to your smartphone via Bluetooth so you can manage all the particulars including security.

The name is iconic, definitive, memorable, viral, a deep well for marketing & advertising, lends itself to endless wordplay in the press / Twittersphere, etc.

Most remarkably it is a name that came to be even though the company could not acquire Coin.com. They did it anyway.

Coin realized that the name was too important to have it be decided by dotcom availability – they reside at onlycoin.com, which won’t hurt them one bit.

Had they bought into the ridiculous herd mentality that it’s better to have a lesser name as long as it matches the dotcom address we would instead be reviewing a marketing, branding & advertising albatross like Coinly or Coinify or Coinacopia or LoinCoin. Or worse.

What To Do When Terrorists Claim Your Company’s Name

From Today’s “MARKETPLACE” On NPR:

What do you do when your brand gets adopted by a terrorist organization? That’s the question faced by businesses with ISIS in their names–the English-language acronym for the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

The most extreme strategy is to simply change the name. Mobile payment app Isis has announced it will change its name to Softcard.

But so far, this is the exception. There are 49 corporations in New York State alone with “Isis” in the name, from Isis Fitness to Isis Nails.

Patricia Luzi is the founder of Isis Essentials, selling organic oils and other products. She’s not afraid of a terrorist homophone.

“Isis is an Egyptian goddess and has been for thousands of years,” she says. “I am not affected at all.”

According to Steve Manning, founder of naming agency Igor, most Isis-branded businesses have nothing to fear because there is little chance of confusion with a violent sect of Sunni fundamentalists.

“But if your business isn’t doing well or if you’ve got a bad reputation, it’s the perfect excuse to make a change,” he adds.

This is what Manning believes was the true motivation of the mobile wallet app that is now called Softcard.

“The irony being this mobile wallet was a huge initiative that never got any traction,” Manning says. “Had it, they wouldn’t have changed the name.”

It wasn’t so much protecting a successful brand, as abandoning a failed one.